Newswire (Published: Thursday, March 19, 2020, Received: Thursday, March 19, 2020, 5:07:16 PM CDT)

Word Count: 524

2020 MAR 19 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Clinical Trials Daily -- Current study results on Oncology - Prostate Cancer have been published. According to news reporting from London, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, “Randomised controlled trials have shown comparable early oncological outcomes after hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in the radical treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). The effect of hypofractionation on treatment-related gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity remains uncertain, especially in older men and those with locally advanced PCa.”

Financial supporters for this research include University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research, Care North Thames at Bart’s Health NHS Trust.

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the Royal College of Surgeons, “A population-based study of all patients treated with radical conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (n=9106) and hypofractionated radiotherapy (n=3027) in all radiotherapy centres in the English National Health Service between 2014 and 2016 was carried out. We identified severe gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using a validated coding framework and compared conventionally fractionated and hypofractionated radiotherapy using a competing-risks proportional hazards regression analysis. The median age in our cohort was 72 years old and most patients had locally advanced disease (65%). There was no difference in gastrointestinal toxicity (conventionally fractionated radiotherapy: 5.0 events/100 person-years; hypofractionated radiotherapy: 5.2 events/100 person-years; adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio: 1.00, 95% confidence interval: 0.89-1.13; p=0.95) or genitourinary toxicity (conventionally fractionated radiotherapy: 2.3 events/100 person-years; hypofractionated radiotherapy: 2.3 events/100 person-years; adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio: 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77-1.10; p=0.35) between patients who received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and those who received hypofractionated radiotherapy. This national cohort study has shown that the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy in the radical treatment of PCa does not increase rates of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity.”

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “Our findings also support the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy in older men and those with locally advanced PCa.”

For more information on this research see: Comparison of Treatment-Related Toxicity With Hypofractionated or Conventionally Fractionated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: A National Population-Based Study. Clinical Oncology, 2020;():. Clinical Oncology can be contacted at: Elsevier Science London, 84 Theobalds Rd, London WC1X 8RR, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Clinical Oncology - http://www.journals.elsevier.com/clinical-oncology/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Nossiter, Clinical Effectiveness Unit, Royal College of Surgeons, London, UK. Additional authors for this research include A. Sujenthiran, M. Parry, B. Berry, P.J. Cathcart, N.W. Clarke, H. Payne, J. van der Meulen and A. Aggarwal.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clon.2020.02.004. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

Publisher contact information for the journal Clinical Oncology is: Elsevier Science London, 84 Theobalds Rd, London WC1X 8RR, England.

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